skip to main content

Mission Monday

October 22, 2018


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

North Salem Middle/High School’s community garden is abuzz with activity this fall. In addition to the Garden Committee’s preparations for the Oct. 25 Harvest Festival, students continue to get hands-on in the garden.

During the Harvest Festival, community members will mingle, clean out their beds in preparation for the winter, plant winter crops and enjoy hors d’oeuvres made from garden ingredients.

Recently, North Salem Open Land Foundation Executive Director and Garden Committee board member Jocko McKean visited Colleen Fodor’s middle school classroom, where he spoke and instructed students in how to set up a no-till garden.

Fodor maintains four of the garden’s beds and frequently involves her students in the planting and maintenance of the garden as part of the curriculum, thanks in part to North Salem Foundation for Learning grant funds.

Other garden efforts include teacher Kristin Doherty’s plans to involve her students in planting in the garden this spring and Garden Committee student representative Ellen Herlihy working with community gardeners to incorporate successful composting methods.

mmmmmmmmm tasty

 

 

September 10, 2018


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Last academic year, fifth-grade students at Pequenakonck Elementary School worked tirelessly and meticulously to plant a beautiful pollinator garden. This practice allowed students to hone their skills of being a good citizen, a component of the district’s Profile of a North Salem Fifth-Grader.

In making intentional choices that demonstrate concern for a sustainable environment, the now sixth-grade students were able to leave behind a lovely legacy for the students who follow them. The garden serves to support local pollinators, including birds, bees and butterflies. By allowing the garden to grow wild with minimal pruning and deadheading, the flowers eventually go to seed and provide food for birds.

PQ students will take advantage of the pollinator garden this year and participate in a wide range of activities, including writing workshops, observing like scientists or simply enjoying a peaceful outdoor classroom.

 

sunflower photo

Chase University River Central School District