skip to main content

Mission Monday

December 11, 2017


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Students are constantly working toward achieving the North Salem Mission and meeting the criteria of their grade-level profiles, both in and outside of the classroom.

Recently, a group of fifth-grade students who ride Bus 12 were acknowledged at Pequenakonck Elementary School for being bus role models for their peers by following all bus rules and displaying safe behavior toward themselves and others.

“We are proud of the ways they demonstrate being exemplary citizens!” said PQ Assistant Principal Dr. Stephanie Bell.

 

mm bus photo

 

December 4, 2017


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Thanks to sponsorships by the PTO and the Foundation for Learning, sixth-grade students participated in A Day in Clay with professional artist, sculptor and potter Cliff Mendelson.

This creative workshop provided an opportunity for an interdisciplinary connection between Jim Savarese’s history class and Lauren Svendsen’s art class. Students were empowered with knowledge concerning the Greek culture, how Greek ceramic vessels were made and their connection to various cultures.

Students persisted in creating their own individual clay vases using the style and techniques of the Greek culture. They expressed various symbols, patterns and imagery that were utilized by the Greeks to explore this tradition, rich in ceramic history. 

“This was a great opportunity for students to stretch and explore their understanding of the art world and the many cross-curricular connections art provides,” said Svendsen.

The vases will be on display in the MS/HS main lobby showcase through January. 

 

 

November 27, 2017

 


 

Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Fourth-grade students applied their knowledge of the four Cs – critical thinking, creativity, communication and collaboration – while aboard the Clearwater Sloop during a recent field trip.

Aboard the ship, students raised the sails, steered the boat, determined water depth, identified species of fish and created sketches that showcased the beauty of the Hudson River.

 

 

 

November 20, 2017


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Combining science and math skills, seventh-graders took advantage of an all-day orienteering field trip to Ward Pound Ridge Reservation in Cross River, where they challenged themselves both mentally and physically.

Leading up to the Oct. 31 outing, students learned and practiced orienteering skills, discovering they had to make their thinking visible and audible to communicate with their teammates. They also had to analyze their thinking and readjust it as they encountered challenges along the way.

At Ward Pound Ridge Reservation, the students located their present positions on a map and then oriented themselves in the exact direction of the next marker.

“[They] then calculated the number of paces they would require to get to that marker,” said Social Studies Department Chairperson Karen Koestner. “Our students accepted the mental and physical challenge as they raced against the clock in this activity.”

 

 

 

 

 

November 13, 2017


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

During the week of Halloween, kindergarten students used their Habits of Mind to create a standing structure based on the poem “The Five Little Pumpkins.”

“Kindergartners were given various materials, including pumpkin toothpicks, clothespins, Play-Doh, Popsicle sticks, pipe cleaners and more, and were challenged with the task of creating five pumpkins sitting on a gate,” said kindergarten teacher Victoria Lodewick.

The students had to think flexibly by using the various materials in different ways to make their structures stand on their own. Some students wanted to give up at times, but persevered and tried a new strategy. 

“The students had a blast acting out the poem using their free-standing gates,” said Lodewick. “Everyone was impressed with the dedicated work!”

 

 

November 6, 2017

Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

“Why did the bead change color?”

Students in Dr. Diane Outhouse’s third-grade class showcased their inquisitive minds by asking questions like that during a hands-on science experiment.

During the experiment, students observed an ultraviolet-light detecting bead, first in the classroom and then outdoors. Working in pairs, they compared the differences in their observations using the Habit of Mind “Gathering Data Through All Senses” and the Visible Thinking Strategy of “See, Think, Wonder.” 

This exercise involved using a variety of critical-thinking strategies to explain their thinking about why the bead changed color when exposed to the sun. Students were excited to make bracelets with the beads at the conclusion of the experiment, which they brought home to share with their parents.

October 30, 2017

Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

With Halloween approaching, the middle/high school library has undergone a spooky makeover.

“For the past week or so, we in the library and Ellen Falk’s math classes have been collaborating to do a STEAM project,” said library media specialist Cynthia Sandler. “We wanted students around the school to explore the amazing power of exponential growth in a fun, visual way. “

Starting with just one zombie, students were challenged to determine how many days it would take for the entire school population to be turned into zombies. Falk’s students joined in on the spirit of the assignment by taking on roles as scientists and mathematicians in an explanatory video that is on display in the library.

“Students have been flooding into the library to count people and figure out how long until we experience total zombie apocalypse. They have been collaborating, communicating and have been using creative and critical thinking to come up with their answers,” said Sandler. “They submit their guesses in a box, and soon, we will award prizes to those who calculated correctly. We will also analyze how students got their answers, right or wrong.”

This extension of math outside of the classroom has attracted students of all ages and abilities to participate and has been an overwhelming success.

“To hear students in grades six through 12 ‘talking math’ in the library is great,” said Sandler. “I look forward to more interdisciplinary collaborations.”

 

 

October 16, 2017

Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Students in Mrs. Jessica Farney’s first-grade class recently reflected on their actions to demonstrate the Habit of Mind “Striving for Accuracy.”

This exercise involved using a variety of creative-thinking strategies to come up with ideas and display good citizenship as students practiced making intentional choices to contribute to a positive classroom environment.

accuracy image

 

October 9, 2017


Welcome to Mission Monday, a series of posts highlighting the ways North Salem students embrace the district mission of engaging in continual improvement, including questioning, defining and solving problems through critical and creative thinking. To learn more about the North Salem Mission, please click here.

Welcome back to a new school year!

The weekly series Mission Monday will be continuing this year, featuring highlights from North Salem’s classrooms and beyond as students throughout the district continue to engage in continuously learning, questioning, defining and problem-solving through critical and creative thinking.

At the middle/high school, Assistant Principal Dr. Kathleen Murphy noted, “The school year is off to a great start. Students are engaged daily in critical and creative-thinking activities, as well as solving problems small and large.”

Pictured is a student working with Ozobots as part of a science lesson.

 

computer image

 

 

Chase University River Central School District